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Tutors

Amit Chaudhuri

Amit Chaudhuri1

Amit Chaudhuri is the author of six novels, the latest of which is Odysseus Abroad. His most recent work of non-fiction is Calcutta: Two Years in the City(2013).

His first novel, A Strange and Sublime Address, is included in Colm Toibin and Carmen Callil’s The Modern Library: Two Hundred Best Novels of the Last Fifty Years. His second novel, Afternoon Raag, was on Anne Enright’s list of Ten Best Short Novels in The Guardian.

He is Professor of Contemporary Literature at the University of East Anglia, and has two highly regarded critical works to his name: DH Lawrence and ‘Difference’ and Clearing a Space: Reflections on India, Literature, and Culture. He is editor of The Vintage/Picador Book of Modern Indian Literature. His only book of poetry, St. Cyril Road and Other Poems, was published in 2005.

He has won the Commonwealth Literature Prize, the Betty Trask award, the Encore Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the Indian government’s Sahitya Akademi Award for his fiction. In 2012, he was awarded the West Bengal government’s Rabindra Puraskar for his book On Tagore – Reading the Poet Today. Later that year, he became the first person to be awarded the Infosys Prize for outstanding contribution to the Humanities in Literary Studies. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Fellow of the English Association, and was a judge of the Man Booker International Prize. In 2008, a Guardian editorial about him appeared in the newspaper’s famous ‘In Praise of…’ series, the first time an Indian writer was so honoured.

He is also a musician, a singer in the North Indian classical tradition with two HMV India recordings and a composer cum performer in experimental music. His second CD in this genre, Found Music (EMI; Babel), was an allaboutjazz.com Critic’s Choice of 2010.

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Anjali Joseph

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Anjali Joseph studied English at the Trinity College, Cambridge after which she dabbled in various professions.She taught French and English in London and Paris, respectively, after which she worked as a journalist with The Times of India in Mumbai.She subsequently trained to be a chartered accountant, but was disappointed with the career. She then completed an MA in Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, after which she published her first novel Saraswati Park in 2010.

 

Saraswati Park told the story of Mohan Karekar, a pensive letter-writer, whose monotonous life undergoes several changes after his gay 19-year-old nephew moves in with him.

 

The book was a critical success; Sameer Rahim of The Telegraph wrote in his review that Joseph’s writing was "well crafted and the images, when they succeed, feel spot-on".For her work, she was awarded the Betty Trask Prize in 2011.The novel also won the Desmond Elliott Prize and the Vodafone Crossword Book Award for Fiction.It was shortlisted for The Hindu Literary Prize in 2010.

 

Joseph’s second book, Another Country, released in 2012. The novel tells the story of Leela Ghosh, a middle-class Bengali girl dealing with friendship, love and betrayal as she travels through Paris, London and Mumbai. Reviewing the book for The Guardian, Joanna Kavenna wrote that the book was "readable and entertaining" and particularly praised the depiction of Indian urban middle-class youth. The novel was longlisted for the 2012 Man Asian Literary Prize.

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Mr Adam Foulds

Mr Adam Foulds

Adam Foulds is a poet and novelist from London. He has been the recipient of a number of literary awards, including the Sunday Times Young Writer Of The Year, the Costa Poetry Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the South Bank Show Prize for Literature, the E. M. Forster Award, the Encore Award, and the European Union Prize For Literature. His 2009 novel, The Quickening Maze, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2010. He was named as one of Granta Magazine’s Best of Young British Novelists in 2013 and of the Poetry Book Society’s Next Generation Poets in 2014. His latest novel, In The Wolf’s Mouth, was published by Jonathan Cape in February 2014.

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Ian Jack

IAN JACK

Ian Jack is a journalist and writer who has edited Granta magazine and the Independent on Sunday and now writes regularly for the Guardian. During his time as a foreign correspondent he covered the Indian subcontinent for the Sunday Times and the Observer, and he has contributed to the New York Review of Books, the London Review of Books, Granta, and many other publications including the Kolkata Telegraph. His awards in Britain include Reporter, Journalist and Editor of the Year. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and teaches occasionally at the India Institute, King’s College, London.

His books include Before the Oil Ran Out (1987), The Country Formerly Known as Great Britain (2009) and Mofussil Junction (2013).

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Jeet Thayil

Co-tutor of the fourth writing workshop

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Jeet Thayil was born in Mamalasserie, Kerala, and educated in Bombay, Hongkong and New York. His four poetry collections include English and These Errors Are Correct, which won the 2013 Sahitya Akademi Award for poetry in English. He is the editor of The Bloodaxe Book of Contemporary Indian Poets.

Jeet Thayil’s novel Narcopolis won the 2012 DSC Prize for South Asian Literature, and was shortlisted for five other prizes, including the Man Booker prize and the Man Asian Literature Prize.’

As a musician and songwriter, he is one half of the contemporary music project Sridhar/Thayil.

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Dr Kirsty Gunn

Co-tutor of the third writing workshop

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Kirsty Gunn is the author of seven works of fiction including a collection of short stories and a compendium of poetry, essays and fragments, and is published in the UK by Faber and in over twelve countries and languages throughout the world.

Her most recent book is The Big Music, published in 2012 to great critical acclaim and was out in paperback in 2013. It was listed for the James Tait Black and Impac awards and was the winner of The New Zealand Book of the Year 2013. The Boy and the Sea was the 2007 Sundial Scottish Book of the Year and her previous work, Featherstone was listed as a New York Times Notable Book and received a Scottish Arts Council Bursary for Literature.

She has a Chair in Creative Writing at the University of Dundee where she created and directs the programme of Writing Study and Practice. Her new collection of short stories Infidelities is to be published by Faber later this year.

She is married with two daughters and lives in London and Scotland.

Author’s website: www.kirsty-gunn.com

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Patrick French

Co-tutor of the second writing workshop

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Patrick French is a leading British writer, historian and literary biographer. His books have been published in over a dozen languages, and he has won international awards including the Hawthornden Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Royal Society of Literature Heinemann Prize, the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award and America’s National Book Critics Circle Award.

His most recent book is India: A Portrait (2011). He is also the author of Younghusband: The Last Great Imperial Adventurer (1994), Liberty or Death: India’s Journey to Independence and Division (1997), Tibet, Tibet: A Personal History of a Lost Land (2003) and The World is What it is: The Authorized Biography of V S Naipaul (2008) – which was a New York Times Book Review Top Ten Book of the Year. Mr French writes for publications including Granta, The Economist, Vanity Fair and The Financial Times.

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Romesh Gunesekera

Co-tutor of the first writing workshop

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Romesh Gunesekera’s first novel Reef was short-listed for the 1994 Booker Prize. His second, The Sandglass, received BBC’s inaugural Asia Award and his third, Heaven’s Edge, like his collection of stories, Monkfish Moon, was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. His novel, The Match, was described in the Irish Times as a book that ‘shows why fiction is written—and read’. Granta Books relaunched his first three books in 2011 and Bloomsbury has just brought out the paperback of his latest novel, The Prisoner of Paradise. He will be co-writing The Writers’ & Artists’ Book of Novel Writing in 2014.

His fiction has been translated into more than ten languages. Reef is now an A-level recommended text and a BBC World Book Club title.

He has run highly acclaimed writing workshops around the world and taught creative writing at universities in Singapore, Hong Kong, Denmark and the UK.

He was on the board of the Arvon Foundation for six years and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and member of its Council. He has also been a judge for a number of prestigious literary awards including the Caine Prize for African writing, the Forward Poetry Prize and Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists.

Romesh was born in Sri Lanka, and lives in London.

Author’s website: www.romeshgunesekera.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/Romesh.Gunesekera

 
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